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Duddova

Duddova is a cosy village at short distance from Ambra, whose name is of uncertain origin but some scholars believe it to be of Ostrogoth legacy. Since the 13th century possession of the Ubertinis - a local noble family - it was eventually sold to the Abbey of Badia a Ruoti. Its strong agricultural background - more specifically that of olive pressing - is well recorded thru the ages, and still today some ancient millstones - as old as 400 years - are scattered throughout the village, that onc

The name of Duddova is peculiar, seemingly coming from an Ostrogoth origin. The castle was in the hands of the Ubertinis until the 13th century, when it was sold to the abbey of Badia a Ruoti.
The village, that is located at a very short distance from Ambra, is very charming and its ancient church, whose building year is unknown – devoted to St. Michael – was completely restored in 1959.
Within the church, there is a fine painting adorning the altar, featuring the Virgin with Child, among St. Romulus and St. Michael the Archangel. Also noteworthy is the painting's stucco frame, displaying the Camaldolese crest, a clear indication of who had ordered the masterpiece.
The name of Duddova is peculiar, seemingly coming from an Ostrogoth origin. The castle was in the hands of the Ubertinis until the 13th century, when it was sold to the abbey of Badia a Ruoti.
The village, that is located at a very short distance from Ambra, is very charming and its ancient church, whose building year is unknown – devoted to St. Michael – was completely restored in 1959.
Within the church, there is a fine painting adorning the altar, featuring the Virgin with Child, among St. Romulus and St. Michael the Archangel. Also noteworthy is the painting's stucco frame, displaying the Camaldolese crest, a clear indication of who had ordered the masterpiece.
Roaming through the narrow lanes of the hamlet it's impossible not to notice the huge millstones – some even as old as four hundred years – scattered here and there against the houses' walls. This is to remind to the traveller, what was the primary business of these places, that is, harvesting and pressing the olives.